We will always remember

Written by on November 7, 2019

This article from our friends at FamilyVoice

As we approach Remembrance Day Monday 11 November, let us pause and reflect on the following.

Engraving their love for the fallen

In the years after the conclusion of hostilities more than a century ago, those who had lost loved-ones during the First World War applied their hearts and minds towards commemoration.​

Each fallen soldier’s headstone provided space for a very brief epitaph, composed by the next-of-kin.​ Limited to 66 letters, including spaces, each commemorative message ran to less than half the length of a single tweet. Here are just a few of the inscriptions:​

WILL SOME KIND HAND​
IN A FOREIGN LAND​
PLACE A FLOWER​
ON MY SON’S GRAVE​

THEY DIED​
THAT WE MIGHT LIVE​
AND LEAVE THE FUTURE WORLD​
IN TRUST TO US​

HOW MUCH OF LOVE​
AND LIGHT AND JOY​
IS BURIED WITH OUR DARLING BOY​

KNOWN UNTO GOD was inscribed on many thousands of graves of “the unknowns”. The inscription on the headstone of Aussie war hero John Simpson reads:​

HE GAVE HIS LIFE
THAT OTHERS MIGHT LIVE

Each letter on the headstone cost “thruppence ha’penny” (as people referred colloquially to 3.5 pence). That equates to a cost per inscription of about one third of a week’s wage – at a time when many people struggled to pay for life’s necessities. This was eventually changed to a voluntary contribution since many families could not afford the expense.​

While a much larger cost was borne by each fallen soldier, the greatest price of all was paid by Jesus Christ, who laid down his life for his friends to bring release to those captured by sin, that all wars might cease.​

Read more on the Christian basis of Remembrance Day (PDF)

Additionally, these artistic resources may be helpful to enrich you


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