Akos Balogh

Page: 3

We must be careful not to blame social media for terrorism. But it’s increasingly hard to deny that it plays a role in helping radicalise terrorists.

It may sound strange, after all isn’t optimism a godlier attitude than it’s polar opposite, pessimism? I don’t think it’s that simple.

One year on, it’s worth us reflecting: what has changed over the last 12 months and how might we act in this new environment?

The growing suspicion that Christians are facing from the wider culture makes this conversation an increasingly urgent one.

Technology wears its benefits on its sleeve, but its drawbacks are buried deep. We need to proceed with eyes wide open, so that we may use technology rather than be used by it.

How should Christians approach digital technology? What should be our mindset in this digital age?

It’s affecting young and old, rich and poor, educated and uneducated. What is this silent epidemic? Loneliness.

Many (white) Christians staunchly defended the rights of Indigenous people in our historic past: no small surprise to some modern secular readers. But the answer to why might be the most surprising.

Many Christians feel we’re losing the ‘culture war’. From SSM to euthanasia, the traditional Christian perspective has lost ground in much of mainstream society. We’re a minority.

This book review of The Frog and The Fish, written for late high schoolers, helps them explore the issues teenagers have always had to deal with: sex, happiness, identity and most recently, technology.


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